Seventy years after it was made, Michael Powell’s A Canterbury Tale remains the perfect remedy for self-pity. Xan Brooks seeks out the film’s locations, still haunted by the ghosts of a film that celebrated the values and traditions of an England under fireIn August 1943 the director Michael Powell came to east Kent to shoot his most ambitious and personal film to date. A Canterbury Tale took its lead from Chaucer to spin the story of three modern-day pilgrims uprooted by the war. It showed us the hedgerows and the hop gardens and the ancient road atop the downs. It celebrated the values and traditions of an England under fire. That wartime summer, the film’s locations came haunted by the ghosts of the pardoner, the falconer, the garrulous wife of Bath. Today, for me, they are haunted by the ghosts of A Canterbury Tale. Seventy years on, it’s as though a fresh layer of myth has been thrown across the first.I doubt there is another film I love as unreservedly as A Canterbury Tale. I first watched it two decades ago, when I was out of college and out of work, the road-map in tatters. On balance, it was the …read more

Via: The Guardian | Books