Although ebooks are seen as the symbol of “disruption” in the trade book marketplace, they’re really just a part of it and they’re the trailing component, not the leading edge. Online sales of print books were making life more challenging for booksellers in the US even before the Kindle debuted in late 2007. And it is the combination of the two — online purchasing of print and the penetration of ebooks among readers — that produces the disruptive effect: shifting the sales of books away from brick-and-mortar stores.
The disruption is evident among booksellers because they, and the shelf space they control, disappear. The disruption is evident among publishers because they are relatively suddenly confronted with a breakdown of the established order: their time-honored techniques for marketing and sales don’t function like they always did. They can’t find shelves on which to put the requisite number of books. They are obliged to find new ways to reach consumers with the message that their books are available because the old promotional avenues, including bookstores shelves, are drying up. Scale doesn’t help them like it used to.
And the disrupted marketplace creates another headache for publishers (and, in some ways, for booksellers too) by …read more

Via: The Shatzkin Files